Asteroid bigger than world’s tallest building to soar past planet Earth TOMORROW – World News

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NASA is tracking an asteroid named 7482 (1994 PC1) which is more than a kilometre wide at 1,052 metres (3,451 feet) – the ‘Near Earth’ object poses no threat and when it passes will still be more than five times the moon’s distance from the planet

An asteroid that is bigger than the world’s tallest building is set to soar past planet Earth tomorrow

An asteroid bigger than any building on Earth is set to soar past the planet tomorrow.

It has been named 7482 (1994 PC1) and is more than a kilometre wide at 1,052 metres (3,451 feet) – making it bigger than the world’s tallest building the Burj Khalifa in Dubai which is 830 metres (2,723feet).

However, it poses no threat to Earth and when it passes it will still be more than five times the moon’s distance from the planet.

NASA ‘s Planetary Defence Coordination Office, which monitors the skies to find, track, and monitor near-Earth objects, is aiming to prove a spacecraft can autonomously navigate to a target asteroid and intentionally collide with it, smashing it off course.







This graphic shows how asteroid 1994 PC1 compares to some of Earth’s tallest buildings
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Image:

Press Association Images)

NASA’s Asteroid Watch Twitter account said today: “Near-Earth #asteroid 1994 PC1 (~1 km wide) is very well known and has been studied for decades by our #PlanetaryDefense experts.

“Rest assured, 1994 PC1 will safely fly past our planet 1.2 million miles away next Tues, Jan 18.”

Nasa is currently looking into defence methods against any asteroids with the potential to stray too close to Earth and recently launched its Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission.







The asteroid poses no threat to Earth and when it passes it will still be more than five times the moon’s distance from the planet
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Image:

Press Association Images)

Nasa said : “DART is the first-ever mission dedicated to investigating and demonstrating one method of asteroid deflection by changing an asteroid’s motion in space through kinetic impact.”

Robert McNaught discovered the asteroid the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia in August 1994.

Nasa’s Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) previously said on its website: “Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are currently defined based on parameters that measure the asteroid’s potential to make threatening close approaches to the Earth.”







Nasa is currently looking into defence methods against any asteroids
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Image:

Getty Images)

Last week, a massive asteroid wider than Big Ben passed Earth.

The rock, dubbed Asteroid 2013 YD48 by NASA, came within 3.48million miles of our planet as it soared through space.

The asteroid measured a massive 104-metres wide making it wider than the famous Westminster landmark Big Ben is tall.

Despite its impressive size, it was slightly too small to be considered a potentially hazardous object – a name given to space junk discovered by the space agency that could prove a threat.

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