Dempsey Fire west of Mineral Wells, continues to challenge Texas firefighters

0
25
Dempsey Fire, June 25, 2022. Texas Forest Service.

The Dempsey Fire six miles west of Mineral Wells, Texas has crossed the Brazos River in several places. It was very active again Saturday, but not to the extreme levels seen on Friday.

When the fire was mapped by an aircraft at 8 p.m. Saturday the northwest side had reached Fortune Bend Road and spotted across. The northeast side of the fire was close to Wrangler Field and had not reached Grassy Ridge Road or Lewis Road. It was about three miles south of Graford, one mile west of highway 337, and two to three miles south of highway 254.

To see all articles on Wildfire Today about the Dempsey Fire, including the most recent, click HERE.

The size at that time, accounting for the large unburned areas along the river, was about 10,000 acres. Sunday morning the Texas Forest Service reported it had burned 11,597 acres.

Dempsey Fire map, 8 p.m. CDT June 25, 2022
Dempsey Fire map, 8 p.m. CDT June 25, 2022.

On Saturday crews continued to construct line, hold the fire along roadways, engage spot fires, and hold the fire along the Brazos River where they could. Aircraft assisted firefighters on the ground with drops from helicopters and air tankers.

Dempsey fire morning briefing, June 26, 2022
Dempsey fire morning briefing, June 26, 2022. Texas Forest Service.

The weather forecast for the fire area issued at 5:55 a.m. Sunday calls for sunny skies becoming partly cloudy after 3 p.m., 100 degrees, 25 percent relative humidity, and 9 to 13 mph winds out of the west shifting to the northeast in the afternoon with gusts to 23 by 5 p.m. The variable wind direction should slow the growth to the north, but will be a challenge to firefighters as they work to remain safe as the direction of spread changes.

Dempsey Fire, satellite photo, 5:31 p.m. CDT June 25, 2022
Dempsey Fire, satellite photo, 5:31 p.m. CDT June 25, 2022. NOAA.
Dempsey Fire
Dempsey Fire, the afternoon of June 25, 2022. Texas Forest Service.

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire.
View all posts by Bill Gabbert

Source