Kansas City area reporting power outages after violent line of thunderstorms

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Power outages have been reported for thousands of customers across the Kansas City metro area after a strong, violent line of thunderstorms pushed into the Kansas City area early Wednesday morning. A tornado warning was first issued for Johnson County, Kansas, shortly before 1:30 a.m. From there, a line of thunderstorms pushed hard and fast from Kansas into Missouri, with multiple tornado warnings issued by the National Weather Service due to radar indicated conditions. First Alert Meteorologist Nick Bender says preliminary reports from the NWS state a tornado may have formed in Overland Park near 95th Street and Antioch between 1:17 and 1:23 a.m. From there, it traveled east along 95th Street to at least State Line Road. Another warning was issued, this time looping in Jackson County, Missouri, shortly after 1:30 a.m. Survey crews will be sent out first thing during daylight hours Wednesday to check the area for damage and determine if a tornado did in fact touch down. So far, there have been no reports of structural damage, however, trees and power lines sustained damage, especially in the northeastern portion of Johnson County, Kansas, along the 95th Street corridor. As of 2:15 a.m., Evergy, the primary utility provider for this area of Kansas City, noted more than 64,000 customers without power. The outage map for Independence Power and Light showed more than 4,000 customers without power as of 2:30 a.m. BPU which primarily services Kansas City, Kansas, noted more than 1,400 outages early Wednesday. The severe threat to the Kansas City area greatly diminished shortly after 2 a.m. While the storm weakened after its initial push through the metro, the First Alert weather team suggests keeping your guard up into the daylight hours. Make sure you still have multiple ways to receive watches and warnings, such as through NOAA Weather Radio, the KMBC 9 app, or other programs.

Power outages have been reported for thousands of customers across the Kansas City metro area after a strong, violent line of thunderstorms pushed into the Kansas City area early Wednesday morning.

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A tornado warning was first issued for Johnson County, Kansas, shortly before 1:30 a.m. From there, a line of thunderstorms pushed hard and fast from Kansas into Missouri, with multiple tornado warnings issued by the National Weather Service due to radar indicated conditions.

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First Alert Meteorologist Nick Bender says preliminary reports from the NWS state a tornado may have formed in Overland Park near 95th Street and Antioch between 1:17 and 1:23 a.m. From there, it traveled east along 95th Street to at least State Line Road. Another warning was issued, this time looping in Jackson County, Missouri, shortly after 1:30 a.m.

Survey crews will be sent out first thing during daylight hours Wednesday to check the area for damage and determine if a tornado did in fact touch down. So far, there have been no reports of structural damage, however, trees and power lines sustained damage, especially in the northeastern portion of Johnson County, Kansas, along the 95th Street corridor.

As of 2:15 a.m., Evergy, the primary utility provider for this area of Kansas City, noted more than 64,000 customers without power.

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The outage map for Independence Power and Light showed more than 4,000 customers without power as of 2:30 a.m. BPU which primarily services Kansas City, Kansas, noted more than 1,400 outages early Wednesday.

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You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

The severe threat to the Kansas City area greatly diminished shortly after 2 a.m. While the storm weakened after its initial push through the metro, the First Alert weather team suggests keeping your guard up into the daylight hours. Make sure you still have multiple ways to receive watches and warnings, such as through NOAA Weather Radio, the KMBC 9 app, or other programs.

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